Teaching Vonnegut 2019 in Indianapolis

    

July 17, 18, and 19, 2019.

Earn professional development credit! Librarians earn LEUs.

Teachers, we know that getting your students to engage with reading can be a challenge. But when we introduce them to Vonnegut, something magical happens. Students are laughing; they’re discussing; they’re thinking deeply and grappling with every complex facet of what it means to be human.

After a great 2018 Teaching Vonnegut in Chicago, the 2019 edition takes place July 17 to 19 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Register for the 2019 program here.

At the Teaching Vonnegut workshop, teachers (middle school, high school, and college teachers of various studies) will hear from Vonnegut scholars on ways to introduce one of our nation’s best authors to young people.  The goal of this program is to give teachers information they need to effectively share Vonnegut’s work with students. Vonnegut’s writing is relevant to social issues today – environmentalism, militarism, human rights, censorship, religion’s place in civic life – and students will find his humor and insights into the human condition fascinating and challenging.

Although the workshop itself is free to all attendees, we will be unable to provide for food, lodging, or parking expenses.

In addition to the great programming happening during Teaching Vonnegut 2019, we will also have special after-hours events. Notably, we will visit the archives of The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI on Thursday, July 18th.

Courtesy of the Estate of Yousuf Karsh, karsh.org
2019 Schedule for Teaching Vonnegut
  • 9-9:30 – Julia Whitehead, Founder and CEO of Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library: Introduction
  • 9:30-11 – Christina Jarvis, State University of New York: No Damn Cat, No Damn Apocalypse?! Cat’s Cradle’s Peculiar Compositional Wanderings
  • 11-12:30 – Rai Peterson, Ball State University: Autobiography in Slapstick
  • 12:30-1:30 – Lunch on your own (although the group often goes together)
  • 1:30-3 – Marc Leeds, Independent Scholar: Beyond the Slaughterhouse: Tralfamadorian Reading Theory in the Novels of Kurt Vonnegut
  • 5:30 p.m. – After-hours social at Red Key with author Dan Wakefield
  • 9-9:30 – Julia Whitehead: Introduction
  • 9:30-11 – Terri Carney, Butler University, Metafiction in Breakfast of Champions and Don Quixote
  • 11-12:30 – Jennifer Tianen (McQuillan), West Bloomfield High School, Michigan, Vonnegut’s Literary Garden
  • 12:30-1:30 – Lunch on your own (although the group often goes together)
  • 1:30-3 –  Jason Aukerman, IUPUI: Mother Night: Breaking through Bias with Free Speech
  • Following Aukerman’s presentation – After-hours social – Tour of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies
  • 9-9:30 – Julia Whitehead: Introduction
  • 9:30-11 – National Alliance on Mental Illness: Free Speech and Mental Health
  • 11-12:30 – Greg Sumner, University of Detroit: Building the Monkey House: Bashers, Swoopers, and Vonnegut’s Writing Process
  • 12:30-1:30 – Lunch on your own (although the group often goes together)
  • 1:30-3 – Kathi Badertscher, IUPUI: God Bless You Mr. Rosewater and Philanthropy
  • 3 – 5:30 – Walking tour of Vonnegut’s Indianapolis with a final stop at the Children’s Crusade exhibition of fine art prints curated by Jolynn Reigeluth at Books and Brews, 643 Massachusetts Avenue

Confirmed attendees may attend on full scholarship. However, if you (and/or your school) are able to make a tax-deductible contribution of $100, $250, or even $560 (the actual cost per participant), you may do so on our secure online donation portal (please state in notes that you are participating in the 2019 Teacher Workshop). Every bit of financial assistance helps us continue to offer these educational opportunities.

To look through addition Education resources created by the Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library, please visit our Education Portal.

The goal: To give teachers information they need to effectively share Vonnegut’s work with students. Vonnegut’s writing is relevant to social issues today – environmentalism, militarism, human rights, censorship, religion’s place in civic life – and students will find his humor and insights into the human condition fascinating and challenging.

Follow #TeachKV on Twitter!

Read a letter from Lewis Black about ways to support this program.

Sponsors

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Made possible in part with support from the Indiana Arts Commission and
the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.


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